01 9 / 2014

"

You are 12. You’re at the library looking for some generic young adult fiction novel about a girl who falls for her best friend. Your dad makes a disgusted face. “This is about lesbians,” he says. The word falls out of his mouth as though it pains him. You check out a different book and cry when you get home, but you aren’t sure why. You learn that this is not a story about you, and if it is, you are disgusting.

You are 15. Your relatives are fawning over your cousin’s new boyfriend. “When will you have a boyfriend?” they ask. You shrug. “Maybe she’s one of those lesbians,” your grandpa says. You don’t say anything. You learn that to find love and acceptance from your family, you need a boyfriend who thinks you are worthy of love and acceptance.

You are 18. Your first boyfriend demands to know why you never want to have sex with him. He tells you that sex is normal and healthy. You learn that something is wrong with you.

You are 13. You’re at a pool party with a relative’s friend’s daughter. “There’s this lesbian in my gym class. It’s so gross,” she says. “Ugh, that’s disgusting,” another girl adds. They ask you, “do you have any lesbians at your school?” You tell them no and they say you are lucky. You learn to stay away from people.

You are 20. You have coffee with a girl and you can’t stop thinking about her for days afterwards. You learn the difference between a new friendship and new feelings for a person.

You are 13. Your mom is watching a movie. You see two girls kiss on screen. You feel butterflies and this sense that you identify with the girls on the screen. Your mom gets up and covers the screen. You learn that if you are like those girls, no one wants to see it.

You are 20. You and your friends are drunk and your ex-boyfriend dares you to make out with your friend. You both agree. You touch her face. It feels soft and warm. Her lips are small and her hands feel soft on your back. You learn the difference between being attracted to someone and recognizing that someone you care about is attractive.

You are 16. You find lesbian porn online. Their eyes look dead and their bodies are positioned in a way that you had never imagined. You learn that liking girls is acceptable if straight men can decide the terms.

You are 20. You are lying next to a beautiful girl and talking about everything. You tell her things that you don’t usually tell anyone. You learn how it feels not to want to go to sleep because you don’t want to miss out on any time with someone.

You are 15. Your parents are talking about a celebrity. Your dad has a grin on his face and says, “her girlfriend says that she’s having the best sex of her life with her!” You learn that being a lesbian is about the kind of sex you have and not how you love.

You are 18. You are in intro to women’s and gender studies. “Not all feminists are lesbians- I love my husband! Most of the feminists on our leadership team are straight! It’s just a stereotype,” the professor exclaims. You learn that lesbianism is something to separate yourself from.

You are 21 and you are kissing a beautiful girl and she’s your girlfriend and you understand why people write songs and make movies and stupid facebook statuses about this and time around you just seems to stop and you could spend forever like this and you learn that there is nothing wrong with you and you are falling in love.

You are 21. And you are okay.

"

a thing I wrote after arguing with an insensitive dude on Facebook all day or Things Other People Taught me about Liking Girls (via in-love-with-a-girl)

(Source: radsadnsassy, via lancasterhazels)

01 9 / 2014

1-4/∞ quotes → Fangirl, Rainbow Rowell (2013)

31 8 / 2014

myraakram:

anna and the french kiss

myraakram:

anna and the french kiss

31 8 / 2014

(Source: alelea)

30 8 / 2014

"Potter has done too much for me for me to ever want to shit all over it. I’m never going to say: ‘Don’t ask me questions about that’. I remember reading an interview with Robert Smith from The Cure. Somebody said to him: ‘Why do you still wear all that makeup, don’t you feel a bit past it?’ And he said: ‘There are still 14-year-olds coming to see The Cure for the first time, dressed like that. I’d never want to make them feel silly.’ It’s a similar thing with Potter. People are still discovering those books and films. It would be awful for them to find out the people involved had turned their backs on it. Though sometimes, people do come up and say ‘I loved you in The Woman in Black,’ which is really sweet. That’s them knowing that it matters to me that I’ve done other stuff."

25 8 / 2014

24 8 / 2014

24 8 / 2014

fishingboatproceeds:

Inspired by Orange is the New Black, designed by Claire, and now available at DFTBA Records.
Edit: Sorry! My initial post went up quickly because we were so excited to have the shirt up and in the rush I did not mention that “It’s a metaphor, you potato with eyes” is a line from the second season of Jenji Kohan’s fantastic Orange is the New Black. Fixed/sorry!

fishingboatproceeds:

Inspired by Orange is the New Black, designed by Claire, and now available at DFTBA Records.

Edit: Sorry! My initial post went up quickly because we were so excited to have the shirt up and in the rush I did not mention that “It’s a metaphor, you potato with eyes” is a line from the second season of Jenji Kohan’s fantastic Orange is the New Black. Fixed/sorry!

24 8 / 2014

coolator:

the turkey swiss on rye incident

(via earthly-pleasures)

24 8 / 2014

get to know me meme: favorite male characters [3/5] → Michael Scofield

We spend so much of our lives not saying the things we want to say. The things we should say. We speak in code and we send little messages, origami.”